Located in the Back Bay of Boston, Massachusetts, lies one of the most important developments in the history of American Architecture known as the Trinity Church of Boston. The church which serves as home to numerous high level choirs was designed by Henry Hobson Richardson during the years of 1872-1877. In 1971, the church was given the honor being designated as a National Historic Landmark.

The church possesses one of the finest stained glass collections in the world, using examples from nineteenth century American and European stained glass studios. The groundbreaking glass work was the ingenious design of John La Farge. He was the first to pioneer the use of layering opalescent glass for designing stained glass.

This allowed La Farge to create new colored effects and shading by layering pieces of glass rather than the traditional method of painting on glass. 

Along with the copious examples of stunning stained glass, one will find a presence of commanding architecture with it's towering ceilings and columns which provide countless opportunities to observe the fine detail and craftsmanship which went into the construction of this masterpiece. The impeccable artistry can also be witness with a quick glimpse upwards. 

This room features the bust of Phillips Brooks, a clergyman, author and long the Rector of Boston's Trinity Church. He graduated from Harvard at the tender age of 20 and was fired while working briefly as a school teacher. After overcoming the lows associated with termination, he went back to school for his Seminary studies which led him to his role with the Trinity Church.

An example of the seating area on the left side of the church.

As you turn around preparing to exit the Church, there are plenty more features to absorb including the organs along the back wall. For anyone visiting Boston, this is a definite destination to add to one's itinerary. Allow ample time to bask in the glory of one of the finest building ever built in the United States of America.